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More fuel

So President Biden releases another 10 million barrels from the strategic petroleum reserve, does the president understand what strategic petroleum reserve stands for. This president is pushing us closer and closer to war with Russia, and when he does it, we will not have any fuel to get over there and fight a war. How much of this fuel will be sold to China? What does Biden do when he has drained the reserve where we no longer have a strategic petroleum reserve for this country? Releasing 10 million barrels to soften the blow at the gas pumps for Americans is ridiculous, for us to save a few pennies it will cost us millions and millions more to replenish what Biden has released.

— Mark Howland, Weymouth

Domestic production

At what point do Massachusetts residents pivot and embrace the unfortunate reality that their all-Democrat delegation does not have their best interests in mind? At what point do the voters of this state come out of the ether and concede that woke progressive policy positions are harmful to their financial wellbeing? My guess is it will be sometime in late November when the temperature dips into the 30s. It will be at that point when the voters have to turn the thermostat up and open their wallets.

The all-Democrat delegation had plenty of time to promote increasing domestic oil and gas production. They could have legislated a new natural gas pipeline from the Marcellus shale formation in Pennsylvania to New England. But no. They don’t really care about your basic needs. They raise funds for their party, attack those who disagree with them, and accept PAC money from organizations which promote extreme positions. They don’t really represent you at all. Now they want you to embrace home heating grants, paid for by you, the taxpayer. They could have encouraged domestic oil and gas producers to invest in additional supply, but that would harm their appeal to the extreme left, the only constituency that matters to them.

— Sean F. Flaherty, Charlestown

School shooting

As a retired law enforcement officer, I almost never get shocked anymore but the latest news out of  Boston Public Schools (“Student shot at Dot high school,” Boston Herald, Oct. 5) is unacceptable. Boston public school parents deserve more than some tired soundbite by Mayor Wu that “What happened today is not okay.” The mayor is correct that you can’t put everything on public schools. This is a citywide issue.

Addressing violence isn’t the job of school officials and teachers, it is everyone’s responsibility. We can keep our schools safer by keeping our communities safer. Our social fabric has been under attack and with it our social order.

The Boston Herald rightfully pointed out that we need policies in place that make all of Boston safe for all of its residents, workers and visitors. It must be safe for all our children who call Boston home.

Current school policy seems opposed to having armed security within our schools. Some Boston public schools have unarmed school security. Perhaps it might be time to reconstruct the so-called Boston School Police and place them inside or near the city’s schools during school days.

Using resource officers along with unarmed school security makes sense.

— Sal Giarratani, East Boston

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